No Amore for Amaretto

Even with the given title of this particular blog post, I promise this is no more matter related to Valentine’s Day! Rather, we are talking about the cordial that captures on the all-natural flavors of the super food almonds, Amaretto Liqueur.

I came across the following 1977 Hiram Walker ad on Vintage Booze which is written with oh so much affection (“sensuous flavors of exotic almonds!”). Who wouldn’t want to go and grab a bottle of Amaretto after seeing this?! The advertisement got me thinking of what recipes called for Amaretto in the 1970s. Ironically enough, I have a copy of “The Complete World Bartender Guide – The Standard Reference to 2000 Drinks” in my desk – a pretty basic cocktail guide given to me as a reference item from my boss. It has an original copyright date from…1977!

Straight to the index I went and was disappointed not to find an Amaretto category. That’s fine – maybe it just isn’t a primary liqueur ingredient. They have “Italian Liqueurs” as an index category; however, all those recipes checked out to be mainly either Galliano or Strega. I checked for the words “almond”, “toasted”, “godfather”, “godmother” and none of them could be found in this bartender guide!

So the question I’m posing today is this: What drinks were being made with Amaretto in the late 1970s?

Although the label has changed over the years, Hiram Walker is still making their all-natural Amaretto Liqueur today. There are literally thousands of recipes in cocktail forums online calling for this product ranging from the Amaretto Sour to the Alabama Slammer and more. Today, I’ll share the Amaretto Rose, a drink so simple to build with common ingredients you already have in your bar. Enjoy!

Amaretto Rose:

  • 1 1/2 parts Hiram Walker Amaretto
  • 1/2 part Lime Juice
  • Fill with Club Soda
Pour Amaretto and lime juice over ice in a collins glass. Fill with Club Soda.

Cheers!
SJ

1 Comment

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One response to “No Amore for Amaretto

  1. Pingback: Old School Amaretto | Cocktail Culture

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